Tag Archives: Nigerians

BB Naija: Overbloated Fuss Over Nothing

By: Afolashade Osho

Big Brother Naija has become a household name; every one – young and old are fans of the game, even though a section of Nigerians, have berated it on moral grounds.

It’s important that people all over need to understand that BBN is a game and at the end, a winner would emerge. We need to stop bad mouthing people that are participating in the current game, as many did in previous editions. I believe it’s because their activities are on record that’s why we could all comment about their ‘lives’ and insult them. Some of what those who make bad comments about participants do in their corner is far worse. If anyone is asked to be part of the programme, perhaps, we would not talk about them the way we do.

Everyone is allowed of free choices, but cursing or saying all sorts of gibberish against someone whose choice is different from yours is not but a sickening attitude. Those who choose to participate in the programme have chosen a path they deem pleasant to them; their choice must be respected.

Life itself is full of up and down; everyone cannot be you, and if you cannot support those currently on the ‘game’ do well and refrain from blind criticism of the whole issues.

Permit me to digress a little. Efe won last edition while Bisola came a close distance to him, in second place. the winner, I don’t know what Efe is doing with his money but Bisola got recognition and has been relevant since then. I like her. This year, it’s no different game. Certainly, we have people we don’t like and we will also have our favourite house mate(s). Personally, I wasn’t following BBN but I kept getting updates on IG, read comments as much as I could. Then, I noticed many were on C-cee, with many horrible stuffs people say about her. Those actually make me like her; she’s not perfect, so are you. I like all the housemates but C-cee is my favourite that was the reason I started following it up. Any updates that doesn’t include C-cee, I am definitely not watching. Regardless, it doesn’t make me comment nasty thing about others.

However, let’s remember we all are not perfect; audience just need to stop commenting bad stuffs; it doesn’t make sense but If you think you are perfect as humans, then you can continue. Some ladies probably hate C-cee probably because she’s going out with tobi. Trust me, if you like continue hating till tomorrow, Tobi will never check you out. Lol. So let’s stop using paracetamol on someone’s headache and enjoy the show for the remaining days.

#BBN #Doublewahala #BigbrotherNaija

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IG finally bars SARS

Worried by the clamour for scrapping of Special Anti-Robbery Squard (SARS) of the Nigerian Police Force, which started with online #EndSars campaign, Inspector General of Police, Ibrahim Idris, has taken decisions.

According to a report by Punch’s Adelani Adepegba, The IG has barred operatives of the SARS, from providing security protection for Very Important Persons.

He also asked them to stop conducting ‘stop-and-search on roads, involvement in civil matters including land disputes, personal disputes, debt collection and other civil issues.

Idris spoke during a meeting with SARS commanders at the Force Headquarters, Abuja on Friday. The IG directed that all operatives of the squad must henceforth appear in official uniform clearly marked for identification.

He said they could only conduct stop-and-search operation on roads when necessary, adding that such operation must be with the permission of Commissioner of SARS or Deputy Commissioner and Assistant Commissioner of Police in charge of operations in the commands they are answerable to.

Any operation conducted by the operatives, according to the Nigerian police boss, must be in a “non-discriminatory, proportional, fair and accountable manner.”

The measures, he said,were as a result of the police administration’s response to the yearnings and demands of modern policing. “In demonstration of good faith to the aspiration of the Nigerian populace, I have given mandate to the IGP’s Monitoring Units and ‘X’ Squad and other oversight units of the Force to monitor the activities of the SARS operatives, while in the same vein, citizens are encouraged to avail the police ways to improve SARS operations across the nation”, he added.

Other measures which the police leadership has taken to reform the SARS, according to the IG, were the designation of the Deputy Inspector-General of Police in charge of operations to lead the unit as its strategic commander and appointment of a Commissioner of Police as a field Commander of all activities related to SARS.

Idris disclosed that SARS operations in each state command would be under the Commissioner of Police through the Deputy Commissioners and Assistant Commissioners of Police in charge of operations.

As part of the reform, the police boss hinted that psychometric test, training and continuous assessment of operatives would be deployed to determine the suitability or otherwise of their role in keeping with acceptable standard operating procedures.

He also said the unit would be confined to its established role of preventing, confronting and solving cases related to armed robbery and generally protecting the public from armed robbery and other violent crimes.

Collapse of security system: A Call for Action

Disturbed by the security situation in the country and the recent outrage by Nigerians calling for the scrapping of Special Anti Robbery Squard (SARS), an arm of the Nigerian police, Punch Newspaper in it’s Editorial page writes:

AT a recent charged plenary session, senators roundly condemned the collapse of the country’s security system. The Senate said that many lives were being lost in the country to clashes and crimes without a major step taken by the government to stop the killings. Regrettably, the Muhammadu Buhari administration creates the impression of helplessness in dealing with the dangerous trend.

Horrible killings have escalated in Numan, Adamawa State. Reports state that about 100 villagers have been massacred following clashes between the locals and invading Fulani herdsmen, who have a history rich in atrocities. The official response has seen Nigerian Air Force planes strafe the villages where perpetrators are holed up. This is a knee-jerk reaction. Fulani herdsmen, on the pretext of cattle rearing, are a major cause of security breaches in Nigeria. They have rendered Benue, Taraba, Nasarawa, Kaduna, Ondo, Cross River, Enugu and Bayelsa states unsafe with their wanton killings and destruction of farmland.

Nigeria is also afflicted with armed robbery, kidnapping, gangland violence, ritual killings and rape. The Boko Haram insurgency is still claiming lives despite the military’s claim of degrading the terror sect. Kidnappers have entrenched their nefarious activities on the Kaduna-Abuja Expressway. In June, they abducted 46 travellers in broad daylight. In November, they murdered a Federal Road Safety Corps official, abducting his colleagues and co-travellers. The police high command made all the right noises, but it all came to nothing.

Citizens live in fear across the country. On December 8, a gang of robbers attacked a bullion van in Asaba, the Delta State capital, in broad daylight, carting away huge sums of money. On December 6, a former Minister of Sports, Damishi Sango, his son and four others were abducted on the Kaduna-Abuja Road. They were released a few days later. Schools in Lagos, including the Model College, Epe; Babington Macaulay, Ikorodu and the Nigerian-Turkish Academy, Isheri, Ogun State, have tasted the wrath of kidnappers. In Ogun State, pipeline vandals brazenly appropriate petroleum products and kidnap for ransom. Rivers State is as terrible. It is a risk to travel in the Emohua corridor of the oil-rich state, where armed militia hijack vehicles at will.

In Zamfara, Niger, Kogi and Kaduna states, cattle rustling is pervasive. In November, Niger Delta militants abducted missionaries belonging to a medical charity, New Foundations, which was founded in 2003. Two of them, David and Shirley Donovan, were released after ransom exchanged hands; but the third, Ian Squire, was shot dead moments after singing Amazing Grace to the group. No one has been held accountable for the security lapse.

But there is enough blame to go round. The lawmakers cannot be divorced from the security breaches. They are part of the elite, who are being protected by about 110,000 police officers, out of a force of 370,000, according to police figures. Apart from being poorly funded, the NPF is infested with armed thugs who are completely ignorant of the laws they are entrusted with to enforce. As presently constituted, the force is an instrument of state oppression and exploitation.

The Buhari administration should publicly set out a clear strategy, including police reform and funding capable of attending to the population’s safety and security. While corruption has to be tackled, recruitment should be conducted transparently to prevent criminals from enlisting in the force. The IG should put a system in place to weed out bad cops.

Effective crime control depends on competent intelligence gathering. But, the Nigerian police have a poor relationship with the public, which views them with suspicion and hostility because of their history of brutality. This ought to be corrected. A healthy relationship encourages the public to feed the police with vital tips on criminal activities. Also, the closed circuit television camera, a critical tool for intelligence gathering in various parts of the world, is almost non-existent in Nigeria. In 2010, the Federal Government signed a $470 million contract with a Chinese company, ZTE Communications, for the installation of CCTV in Abuja and Lagos. Seven years on, there is nothing to show for it.

In contrast, there were 4.9 million CCTV cameras in Britain or one for every 14 people, and 750,000 in sensitive locations such as schools, hospitals and care homes as of 2014, according to a British Security Industry Authority survey. A few days after a bomb attack on a music concert in the Manchester Arena in May, police released CCTV images of the suspect, Salman Abedi, 22, who was captured on security film at Manchester Airport, Market Street and Granby Row near Piccadilly Station. Police used the footage to call for more information on him. Without an effective CCTV system, body-worn videos, drones, number-plate recognition system and other high-end technological devices, the Nigerian police would be groping in the dark.

For now, Nigeria is under-policed. A single, centralised police force for a population estimated at 193.3 million by the National Bureau of Statistics cuts an underwhelming picture. New solutions recommend themselves to Buhari and Idris.

The President should work with the parliament to decentralise the policing system, and build up capacity with armoured personnel carriers, communications equipment, helicopters and surveillance systems. Efficiency requires community policing. It is an aberration that such is absent in the country. Apart from community police forces, schools, estates, highway patrol forces, state police and local council police, should be in place as soon as possible. Ultimately, the fight against crime is about involving the community.

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As rate of unemployment in the country stands at the sky, with government trying to placate the situation, Uche Metuh bares her mind;

I’ll tell you a story.

There’s this girl who aced all her subjects in secondary school.

Not just acing but award-worthy educational success.

She was so good that at her Junior Secondary 3 (JSS 3) level, she was solving mathematical problems from Senior Secondary 1/2 (SS 1/2) curriculum.

1st Mistake

She loved Maths & computers but was admitted into the university to study Geology.

Today, she still thinks she would have been a statistics wizard if she’d been allowed to just study Math or Engineering. You know – subjects where she doesn’t have to always cram some qualitative garbage but provide quantitative solutions.

2nd Mistake

When she got into the university, she realized she didn’t have to study very hard. Very few people were bothering to anyway. She was extremely smart & could hold her own but it became easier to combine intellectual efforts with other students at assignments, tests & final exams.

The system allowed it.

All her friends did it so, why fight it?

3rd Mistake

While at school, no one ever taught her how to write a résumé or successfully approach interviews.

She, just like everyone around her wanted a good life but the system pretty much set them up to fail.

When she graduated, she met a professional at an international oil & gas company who asked her what she wanted to do in life & to explain her undergraduate degree experience but she was not prepared for that.

She gave answers which were weak, mostly incoherent, lacked precision or clarity.

She’d never thought of herself in that light.

The internet wasn’t readily accessible back then so she was pretty much left on her own with her fellow ignorant peers.

She also had a great & supportive family who she leaned on.

Luckily for her, she got some mentors, then left the country for her masters degree.


At 1st, she struggled at her Canadian university.

Correcting her 2nd mistake

She had to actually learn all those skills & resources she didn’t bother with back in Nigeria due to combined students’ efforts.

She had to read all those textbooks she never bothered with in her Nigerian university in order to excel at her program.

Correcting her 3rd mistake

She also met lecturers whose method of teaching was about empowering students to run with their ideas.

It wasn’t about multiple choice questions but making a case of why Case A is better/worse than Case B.

It made her actually think for the 1st time in her life. She learned how to make great presentations. It was a confidence boost. It was exhilarating!

She learned about plagiarism which is a very despicable thing. She also learned about self-development, professional development & presentations.

She learned it was ok to make decisions, make mistakes & then learn from them.

She became comfortable working alone & also with a team. She learned the power of independence.

She was a different person.

She became more confident about her thoughts & ideas. No one laughs at her mistakes nor condemns her for them.

Her bosses don’t care about always being right or barking orders at those under them. Team contributions is crucial, encouraged & needed.

Everybody is equal. No one feared anyone. It was a healthy environment. She was valued. She freely runs her program the way she sees fit.

This is my story.

There’s no correcting my 1st mistake. If I ever do, I’ll tell a story about it.

If you read this, you’d understand how the Nigerian system encourages laziness & might discourage talent because of envy or pride.

Many Nigerian graduates are victims of their own underdeveloped & redundant society.

Maybe with the internet, a few might self-improve. Otherwise, they’re unemployable because there’s very few people to teach them better.

Note to any Nigerian student reading this – don’t take the easy way out. Read not just to pass your examinations but to actually know.

You’d be truly a better person & student for it.

Good luck!

CORPS MEMBER TASKS SCHOOLS ON NATIONAL DIGNITY, DONATES NIGERIAN FLAGS

A Corps member identified as Ajadi Samsideen has encouraged schools in the country to imbibe the good use of national identity.

He made the call during a sensitization programme he organized as part of his Community Development Service Project as a corps member serving in Kogi state. He also donated flags to some schools in the area.

The seminar, titled “National Symbols: Pride of Our Country”, held at Government Day Secondary School, Iruvucheba, Okene recently.
Mr. Ajadi observed that many schools in the community hung shabby flags while many did not have any to display.

According to him, “It sadden my heart to see our schools such tattered and rag-like flag hung”.

A former Chairman of Okene Local Government, Alhaji Al-Rasheed, while speaking during the event attributed the lack of attention given to the national identity to hunger and non payment of salaries in the state.
He noted that unhappy family and unpaid workers will never remember that a flag is dirty.

He advised chools to ensure they contribute positively to this disturbing situation of the country.

Another corps member who was present at the event, Oyeyipo Oluwasegun said that schools should do more to enlighten people and students on the significance of National symbols.

“Our national symbol is what we have to sell to the outside world. Our schools must do well to educate the people on what the Nigerian national symbols stand for And this can only be done when the those identifies are in good condition.” he added.

Students and staff members of schools in the area were present during the seminar while he schools representatives received the brand new flag on behalf of their schools.

​OUR MANY TRAVAILS AND THE NEED TO CONSOLIDATE OUR DEMOCRACY

By: Moshood Muhammed

Generally speaking, the people constitutes mainly the element, admissible and permissible in democracy, the Nigerian system of government, with whom the decision of who becomes what, get what and at what time is taken and for.

With reference to the definition a former President of United States of America, Abraham Lincoln, participation of people, who are an indispensable element of government and leadership of a country, is believed to be non-negotiable. But, reverse is sharply the case in the issue of Nigeria, the most populous black-skinned people country in the world.

The rare magnanimity of the then military ruler and Head of State, Rtd. General Abubakar Salami saw Nigeria return to democratic rule in 1999 with Olusegun Aremu Okikiola Obasanjo as the democratically elected President. After he exited office, Nigeria has successfully transferred power from one leader to the other and most recently, from a political party which Nigeria started with, the Peoples Democratic Party (PDP) to the now ruling All Progressives Congress (APC), in a very peaceful and uncommon manner, alien to the African politicians and its many years of political sojourn. This remains one of the feats we have achieved as a country.

On return to democracy eighteen (18) years ago, expectations were high, no thanks to the ‘nightmares of military rule’ and having seen what democracy infers in other climes. Nigerians could not hide their joys when the Obasanjo administration came on board; many were promised with very infinitesimally done so far and nothing done in many cases, even by successive occupiers of the Aso Villa and other public positions in the yesteryears up till now.

Power supply has remained consistently out of supply in many homes, villages, cities and factories, forcing Nigerians to make darkness their neighbours, while many businesses went out of operation, with others relocating to neighbouring countries; education is yet to recover from the colossal damage done to its structural and administrative hitherto strong rooting. Same is the case with Agriculture, which was formally our source of national financial muscle depleting into a business of very few with little concentration from government, not until recent time. The list is endless.

As much as it incontrovertible that all is not so well, coupled with corruption fast becoming regalia of our political actors, it does not translate to the end of the road for the country. The country has despite the political upheavals that greeted the preparation for last general elections among other issues emerged, a united country, though with affray from some parts of the country.

As Nigerian democracy gets a year older, concerted efforts must be made by all in seeing the birth of the new and assuring country Nigerians would be proud of.
Now, the leadership of the country and government structures across board must be sanitized and made to work in the interest of the people, while the trademark of corruption on most political office holders is ‘confiscated’. Our leaders must be aware that if everyone who has at one point or the other occupied the office did not leave, they would never have the opportunity to get there.

Furthermore, the central government must not surrender in its struggle for a well respected country in Africa and beyond, flush out, in sincerity the demonic corruption tendencies, that has almost brought the country on its knees, out of the country; wipe out the inkling Boko Haram insurgence stint, rescue the remaining Chibok School girls, get back home Nigerians leaving like foreigners on the own soil, neighbouring countries. Also, our economy which somersaulted must also be revamped, with the diversification plan executed speedily while ensuring an enduring, stable and uninterrupted power supply to all nooks and crannies of the country. This will do doubt help recover our hailing economy and set us forthwith on the path to prosperity.

On the other hand, Nigerians must see The New Nigeria project as a collective assignment, on which the destiny of millions of our country men and women are tied to, and indeed that of many generations yet unborn. Should the war against corruption be won, proceeds recovered and ultimately pumped into the economy, Nigerians can be certain of a speedily developed country. Hence, everyone must resolve to join the campaign, reject proceeds of crime and never be involved corruption. Charity they say begins at home.

Similarly, our parents, families, religious leaders, teachers and schools must note that they are either partner in crime or partner in progress, depending on what they make of the flock in their care. There is therefore a great need to have them support government and by far, the popular view, rid the country of many rots she has found herself in. This implies that the song of anti corruption, transparency, accountability, hard work and perseverance should be continuous on their lips.

The truth is, should we fail to augment our resolution for the ‘hell-lots’, vent our displeasure with the widely affirmed abysmal state of things, by participating meaningfully in the affairs of the country, our complaints would be mere noise. In other words, our political affairs, call for accountability, responsive and responsible government should not be left in the hands of politicians and the acclaimed ‘opposition’ parties, we must all make Nigeria work for our good. The rumoured military take-over is not and will never be in the interest of majority of Nigerians. As such, we must all defend our democracy and make it stronger.

Though, all may not be rosy for us as a country, it is never a time to give up; our participation in governance should be strong, defiant of oppression tendencies of any public office holder, bad governance, misrepresentation among others, like never before. Surely, we would get there.

If you are not participating, it is not making sense. #Standwith9ja

God bless Federal Republic of Nigeria